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Module summaries

The Module summaries below give both a brief description of what the units contain and a list of the useful resources they provide.

Module 1: Grammar

Units in Module 1 provide the following resources that can be printed and used as reference materials:

  • an explanation of correct usage for each grammar point
  • a strategy table for dealing with common errors related to the particular grammar point
  • a summary of the key points in the unit.
Table of definitions and errors in Module 1 of the WriteSite

Unit

Topic

Definition/error

1

Sentence fragments

An unfinished sentence which lacks a subject and finite verb.

Examples:

  • Enabling them to carry out the experiment.
  • In spite of the Government’s best efforts.

2

Run-on sentences
(or ‘comma splices’)

Two simple sentences that are joined only by a comma rather than a suitable conjunction.

Examples:

  • In a situation of deadlock, neither party has the ability to outvote the other, this means the smaller parties become more influential.
  • Unsafe workplaces may cause many injuries, also companies will incur high costs as a result.

3

Subject-verb agreement

Plural or singular subject lacks a corresponding verb.

Examples:

  • Democracy and education is closely linked.
  • Many theories to explain the volatile performance of conglomerates over the economic cycle has been advanced.

4

Tenses

Wrong tense chosen or incorrect formation of tense.

Examples:

  • Developing countries are having little chance of improving living conditions as long as they are hostage to the World Bank.
  • European occupation of Australia had a catastrophic effect on Aboriginal health. This results in widespread population decline.

5

Passive vs. active voice

Wrong choice of passive or active voice or incorrect formation of passive voice.

Examples:

  • Indigenous Australians are experienced discrimination in many areas of their lives.
  • Although inflation has identified as a contributing factor, it remains a minor one.

6

Apostrophes

Omission of apostrophes, or wrong usage of apostrophes (such as substitution of singular ‘s for plural s’ , or the use of  it’s rather than its).

Examples:

  • The Governments policy needed several revisions.
  • Of all the issues arising in the developing world, many country’s water supplies are a major concern.
  • The inflation rate and it’s effects on employment figures are widely documented.

7

Articles

Wrong choice of article, omission of article or insertion of article when it should be omitted.

Examples:

  • A Bengal tiger is an endangered species.
  • He presented a paper on diabetes in Czech Republic.
  • The silence occupies a special place in the Japanese language.

Thanks to Diana Montgomery formerly of the Faculty of Economics and Business for the provision of this table.